Interested in the history of cartography and the quest of mapping the earth’s globe on a flat piece of paper? Want your imaginary world to have a touch of realism or believability? Than the March Annual issue is for you. Check out more than a dozen new templates, showing different map projections, and instructions on how to convert these into your favorite mapping style.

If you are an Annual subscriber, log into your registration page to download it. If not, you can subscribe to the Cartographer’s Annual 2014 here.
Orthogonal Polar Template

DeRust ExpansionAs a thank you for our loyal Annual customers, and to make up for the free version of the November hex style (included in CC3 Update 11), we have released an extra Annual issue. It expands on TJ Vandel’s DeRust Overland style of September.

The already huge collection of more than 400 symbols of mountains, hills, and other natural features, gets extended by two more symbol sets of different colorations and textures. Download the December bonus issue from your registration page.

The expansion pack DeRust Overland includes

  • 464 new bitmap symbols in four new catalogs
  • 2 new bitmap fills
  • 3 new drawing tools
  • 2 updated template wizards
  • 1 example map (fcw and png)
  • 1 3-page mapping explaining the new features

P.S.: The re-subscription offer for the Annual 2014 will become available shortly. We’ll keep you posted.

The December Annual issue is now available from each subscriber’s registration page. This issue completes the trio of drawing styles based in the 1930s Baedeker travel guides: Floorplans, city street maps, and now overland maps.

The 1930s Overland style uses an uncommon (for CC3) method to depict hills and mountains, and in doing so the mapping guide takes a close look at the Symbols Along/Escarpment command in CC3.

County of Shealagh

While the December entry, this Annual issue is not the last one for this year. We’ll be releasing a bonus issue towards mid-December, expanding on the DeRust overland style.

The latest Annual issue is now available for subscribers from their registration page. The November Annual consists of a new hex mapping style based on the Bitmap Overland style that comes with CC3.

Templates, symbols and tools allow you to create a hex-based setting map in minutes, giving you that old-school explorer feeling with modern graphics! Check out this sample map of “The Warring Isles”:

The Warring Isles

Check out the freshly released September issue of the Cartographer’s Annual 2013. TJ Vandel, an amazing fantasy cartographer and Cartographer’s Guild regular (user name Schwarzkreuz), created a huge selection of bitmap symbols for your mapping pleasure. We compiled them into this new overland style.

Here’s a little preview of the upcoming July annual by Pär Lindström. Check out his nice black and white style.
Example Pär Lindström BW

You can subscribe to the Cartographer’s Annual 2013 here.

We’ve just released the June issue of the Cartographer’s Annual 2013. Check out the Comic Book look of this vector overland style.
Comic Book Map
This style has been inspired by the artwork of illustrator James Stowe.

We have released the April issue of the Cartographer’s Annual 2013: The Midgard World overland style. Created in cooperation with Kobold Press and Jonathan Roberts, this style recreates the maps published in the Midgard fantasy campaign setting and the accompanying iPad atlas. You can now add your own regional maps for this setting, or recreate another world in the same mapping style.

CA76 Example

Even better, the Midgard World style is compatible with the Jon Roberts overland style from the Annual Vol 5. They can be combined for a greatly enlarged variety of symbols and fill styles.

We’ve just released the March Annual issue: Flavio’s Myrr Overland style is now available as a download for the Annual subscribers.

His beautiful and unique overland style is based on intricate bitmap texture and shaded contours, as you can see from this sample:
CA75 Myrr Dominion

You can subscribe to the current Annual here.

[Ed's Note: Let us know if you like this style, and with Flavio's permission, we'll create an Annual from it]

My fiancée recently asked me if it would be OK to make a Viking character for my Al-Qadim campaign.  I thought about the role playing possibilities for a moment: Viking gets lost at sea en route to pillage and plunder; Viking gets shipwrecked in hostile desert environment; Viking PC makes for a very interest game indeed.  I then thought about where such a Viking would come from in my world and set about creating a map of his home.

 

Myrr Dominion

 

Myrr is a semi-arctic region largely inspired by Scandinavia, Iceland, and Alaska.  I spent a great deal of time looking over maps of their fjords and river systems in the hope that I could create something similar and believable in my own map.   After an hour or two tinkering around with the fractal line tool (adding a river here, indenting land mass there, etc), I finally had a landmass and set of islands I could be happy with.

The next step was to create the mountain range.  I first drew the main ridge of the mountain and all the little ridges that branch off of it with the smooth poly tool. This is what the looked like without effects on.

mountain1

I gave it a rather long and dark wall shadow, a deep edge fade inner (with 75% inner opacity), and a large lighted bevel effect (so that the two sides of the bevel met in the center of the polygon).  I then added a Mountain Hills sheet that encircled the range with a smaller edge fade inner and lighted bevel effect.  Next, I added a Mountain Base sheet that encircled the Mountain Hills (also with a smaller edge fade inner and lighted bevel effect.)  Because I wasn’t thoroughly happy with the colors that were coming out, I finalized it with a Mountain Cover sheet.  This shows the details of the effects:

mountain2

And this is the final mountain range:

mountain3

 

As you can see, I also used the Mountain Base sheet to layout my hills.  I further added a Hills Base sheet that encircle these hills and had a deep edge fade inner to give the illusion of height.  From there I added some forests (very subtle), rivers, text, (about a dozen assorted sheets to get the ocean, landmass and desert looking right) and called it a day.  All of the textures came from Herwin Wielink annual and CGtextures.com.

This map was a great deal of fun to make and I learned a new technique for mountains in the process.   Of course, the best part is now crafting a history about this region to help fill in the gaps of my fiancée’s character’s back-story.  Although I’m far from done, you can check what I have so far (along with a full resolution version of the map) at my blog.

 

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