The deadline for my December Annual style is closing in and luckily enough the style is slowly coming to a more or less finished state. A lot of things, small and big have changed since my last blog post about the style. The city icons have been remade and some of the terrain I’ve gone over a second time to make sure they are good enough.

One interesting thing I’ve learned from making this style is that the end result has a tendency to change a bit while you work. The Truscian peninsula map, that is the original map for this style, is a regional map that still is quite zoomed out. The finished style will be suited for a more zoomed in regional map. Not that you won’t be able to do the zoomed out version but I think that it is in the more zoomed in version that the style will really shine.

There are still some things left to do on the style, I might try to add in some more icons and I’m thinking of adding in one or two mountain ranges that you can use as the base while creating your mountains. Just to make it easier for you to make a quick map.

The map below is the latest test map of the style. I hope you like it.

Originally posted on mappingworlds.wordpress.com

We’ve decided to release six free issues of our Cartographer’s Annual to give non-subscribers a taste of what they are missing.  Three of these issues were previously released free, the others – only subscribers have seen them to date.

You can download the installation here.

All ProFantasy customers who haven’t opted out will have received a voucher valid until the end of the month with a discount from any single Annual purchase. If you haven’t received yours, email us.

Free Issues

CA04 Sarah Wroot

April 2007

The style pack Sarah Wroot Overland gives you all the tools to create maps similar to the work of master illustrator and cartographer Sarah Wroot.

Mapping Guide: Sarah Wroot Style

 

CA21 Battle Maps

September 2008

The map pack “Battle Maps” contains several examples, templates and instructions on how to create your own miniatures map for your gaming table.

Mapping Guide: Battle Maps

 

CA36B Battle Tiles

December 2009

The December special issue contains a tutorial pack on creating quick and easy geomorphic Battles Tiles, complete with video tutorials by Joseph Sweeney.

Watch Joseph Sweeney Online Tutorials on YouTube.

 

CA43 Hex Maps

July 2010

The style pack Overland Hex Maps gives you the winning entry of the 2010 user suggestions vote.

Mapping Guide: Hex Overland Maps

 

CA54 Jon Roberts Dungeons

June 2011

The style pack Jon Roberts’ Dungeons contains a new drawing style for dungeon floorplans and battlemaps.

Mapping Guide: Jon Roberts’ Dungeon

 

July 2012

The symbol and texture pack High Space SciFi Tiles contains hundreds of new textures and symbol, accompanied by video tutorials by Joseph Sweeney.

Watch Joseph Sweeney Online Tutorials on YouTube.

 

We’ve got previews up for the two remaining Annual issues of 2012.

In November we have an extensions to the fan-favorite overland style by Herwin Wielink from April. Orcs, Elves and Dwarves get symbols for their cities, castles, etc, together with lots more symbols and textures to choose from. It basically doubles the resources included in the original style.
Example November Annual

We close the Annual 2012 subscription in December with a new style by Pär Lindström. This one is specifically designed for creating regional campaign maps, ie smaller areas than your typical continental or world campaign map.
December Example

More images in the Annual gallery.

We’ve just released the October issue of the Cartographer’s Annual 2012. It contains a huge amount of gorgeous bitmap artwork which focuses on alien starships and landscapes. It was created by Storyweaver (Joseph Sweeney’s rpg company) in conjunction with their High Space setting.

CA70 Wrecked Alien Ship

This is the second part of the immense collection of bitmap art, the first part having been released in July. The October issue also integrates all the bitmap artwork and drawing tools into new template wizards based on Cosmographer 3′s Deckplan Bitmap A style.

Cut a section from a larger map and expand it.The August issue of the Cartographer’s Annual 2012 has been released. It contains a 10-page introduction and tutorial to the Cut menu and its commands, a way to cut out and export a section of a larger map in CC3.

We’ve also added previews to the September and October issues to the Annual website. Check out the September issue and the Gallery page for some previews of the beautiful map included in Pelgrane Press’ upcoming rpg 13th Age (by Rob Heinsoo and Jonathan Tweet).

If you are a subscriber, you will notice that we’ve changed the way the download for the Annual works. For details, please check here for details.

I’ve subscribed to the Profantasy Annuals since the beginning and I must say that it has been a great investment. I’ve learned a lot from the included PDF’s that comes with the monthly style and most of the styles are really great. But then sometimes there is a month when you think “when will I ever use that style!”.  But you should never say never, suddenly you might have use for a style you thought you’d never touch.

This happened to me when it comes to the 2010 Annual May edition, Abstract maps. When I received it I first thought it was a real waste of space on my hard drive. When would I ever use that, but that was before I went to London with my son.

When my son was eight I took him on a trip to London. They had just started to learn English in school and I thought that going to England would be a great way to motivate him to learn the language. Of course we could also have a great time visiting museums and interesting landmarks like Big Ben and the London eye.

As it turned out he got really hooked on the Underground. We don’t have one where we live and for a child it is fascinating to go on a train far below the surface. We ended up doing a lot of travelling with the underground and we even bought a London underground game that we’ve played while coming home again.

After returning to Sweden my son thought it was fun to play that he was travelling with the underground, pretending that different rooms in the house where stations. I suddenly remembered that I had a style for CC3 where you could make underground maps. Quickly I started the program and made a map for him where all rooms where stations and different lines went to different parts of the house. I even added some lines that continued out in the garden.

So you should never rule out a style, who knows in the end you might have a use for them all.

Republished from Mapping Worlds.


I’ve really looked forward to the release of this year’s June Annual that gives you a new drawing style by Herwin Wielink: Isometric Dungeons. The style itself includes some really fantastic graphics and possibilities and it lets you create a new good looking map in no time at all (compared to if you’d do all the graphics by hand).

The style itself was a bit tricky to work with for me. Or if you put it another way, the style really showed me how much I still have to learn to completely master Campaign Cartographer 3. Maybe I have to take a closer look at the Tome of Ultimate mapping to catch up on a thing or two.

Getting all the different objects in the correct order in the map really gave me a slight headache. When you create a map in this style you really have to plan in what order to do things, if you don’t want to move things back and forth on the actual sheet. It took me some restarts of the map to get a hang on it. But once you understand the logic everything runs a lot smoother. The secret of success is to work from one of the top corners to the opposite lower corner. In this way you will naturally get the graphics in the right order and you don’t need to rearrange the order of the rooms and corridors all the time.

When you reach that point everything also gets a lot more fun. I really enjoyed working with the style and the result gets so good that you just want to keep going, it’s just as addictive as playing a good computer game.

However there was one thing I felt was very frustrating with the style, and that was that I want more!  The style feels like a small taste of something that could be amazingly fantastic. I want circular rooms, walls with windows, more furniture, different floors, traps, outdoor environments, sewers and I could continue that list for another two posts. This is what Perspectives 3 (if it comes out) should look like.

At the moment when the selection of different graphics isn’t too vast a lot of maps will turn out looking quite similar. So it is quite hard to do something unique with the style, but I’m hoping for a bright future and more isometric add-ons in future Annuals maybe.

Originally posted on mappingworlds.wordpress.com

I’ve started to play a simple and easy to understand roleplaying game with my two oldest children (this is also the reason that the names in the map are all in Swedish, they don’t read English). And of course no game can be really appreciated without a world map to look at.

So I decided to make one while trying out the April annual style from Profantasy, made by the artist Herwin Wielink.

It is always hard to start working with a new style, it takes a while just to get used to the style itself. What graphics are included, fields, desert, marshes, rivers, forests and so on. A good thing is to just create a couple of test maps to get used to the style, to get the feeling of it. In this case I did that, but not only on purpose. I’ve read on a lot of places that people complain that CC3 can be a bit unstable, that it sometimes crashes a lot.

Well I’ve never experienced that, apart from with one of my more ambitious projects where the actual file grew too large for CC3 to handle. But with this particular style I actually had two crashes where I had to restart the whole project from the start again. That has never happened before and it was probably just a coincidence that it happened now, but I guess that the end result ended up better because of this. You can say that I learned from the mistakes in the two earlier maps, so I didn’t need to repeat them in the final map. [Editor's notice: If you ever lose your map, look for autosave.fcw in your CC3 folder.]

The graphics in the style are absolutely gorgeous and mountains, forests and other symbols really melt into the background in a great way that kind of hides the fact that the map is made in CC3. The only other CC3 style I can think of that accomplishes this as good as this one is the 2011 March annual overland style by Jonathan Roberts.

I also like the colour palette a lot in the style. Sometimes I think that maps made in CC3 can be bit cartoonish when it comes to colour, this particular style though has a really nice dark feeling about it. I like that.

Overall the style was very easy to use, the selection of textures and symbols are vast so you can really get some great variation into the map. And variation is very good if you want to make a map that is unique and nice to look at.

As usual I’ve done the labeling in Photoshop, I just can’t get it to work satisfactory in CC3, but that is probably because of me and not the program. The font is the same though as the one included in the style.

(Originally posted on mappingworlds.wordpress.com)

Here’s a little sneak preview of the June Annual: Isometric Dungeon by Herwin Wielink:
Isometric Dungeon style

We’ve just made the April issue of the Cartographer’s Annual 2012 available. Enjoy a beautiful new overland style created by Herwin Wielink. It’s the first time you see his art in the Annual, but it won’t be the last!

If you haven’t subscribed to the Annual 2012 yet, check out more information on this issue on the Annual website.

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